The Cyberguard

The word Cyberguard stands for the Russian Kiberdruzhina. Being a word of Common Slavic origin, druzhina (feudal prince’s armed guardsmen) is derived from drug – a noun originally meaning “companion, fellow warrior”, akin to Old English dryht “retinue, armed followers”. Druzhina referred to feudal prince’s friends and companions that helped him protect his land.

The Druzhina retinue with the prince at its head not as a lord but as first among equals dates back to eight century Rus.

Being the land’s most stalwart defenders, Druzhina retinues played a vital role during the period of tense struggle against constant nomad invasions. They were therefore always held in high esteem, taken great care of and offered generous gifts by princes and the people.

To translate it into English, we have chosen the word guard – Cyberguard – to reflect the idea of constant watchfulness and protection, also implied by the Neighbourhood watch grassroots movement common to most Western countries.

What is the Cyberguard?

Neighborhood watch: n. a program of systematic local vigilance by residents of a neighborhood to discourage crime, esp. burglary (New Oxford American Dictionary, 3rd Edition, 2010).

Readiness to create neighbourhood watch units is a sign of a healthy community ready to come together to fight crime.

Taking their name from Early Russian Druzhina retinues, Soviet-era druzhinnik neighbourhood watch units helped the authorities maintain law and order.

The Cyberguard is an online neighbourhood watch organization uniting individuals who volunteer to detect illegal online activities and report them to the authorities.

Cyberguard volunteers are people who care about the future of their country’s future generation.

Their aim is to fight illegal online content, above all that which threatens the physical and moral health of children.

What does the Cyberguard fight against?

Its aim is to fight illegal online content, above all that which threatens the physical and moral health of children.
  • Child pornography;
  • Pornographic materials accessible to minors;
  • Materials containing violent scenes, including extremist in nature;
  • Materials encouraging drug and alcohol abuse.

Cyberguard ranks

Desyatnik (Russian for “chief of ten men”) Given to Cyberguard members after they detected ten web or social media sites containing, advertising or hosting links to dangerous content.

Sotnik (Russian for “captain of hundred men”) Given to Cyberguard members after they detected one hundred web or social media sites containing, advertising or hosting links to dangerous content.

Tysyatsky (Russian for “commander of thousand men”) Given to Cyberguard members after they detected one thousand web or social media sites containing, advertising or hosting links to dangerous content.

The League’s support of Cyberguard members

Among Safe Internet League members are influential organizations: big businesses and law enforcement agencies. Their task is to arm Cyberguard volunteers with the necessary tools and to help and support the most active among them.

Cyberguard volunteers and League activists live and work across the whole of Russia.